SNC Psychology Students go to UC Berkeley to Present Research

BIRCA total of five Sierra Nevada College undergraduates and three Sierra Nevada College alumni presented at the 3rd annual Berkeley Interdisciplinary Research Conference (BIRC) on May 3rd, 2014 at UC Berkeley.

The undergraduate students: Morgan S. Burke, Margaret K. Burns, Cindy A. Conover, and Dana Hoffelt.

Our Sierra Nevada College alumni and their projects included: Constance A. Barnes presenting for fellow authors, Christina M. Frederick, Kallie B. Day, Robert King, Carly Courtney, and Briana Crespo, Elizabeth M. Hill, and Anna Jarschke.

This trip was rewarding for both Sierra Nevada College’s undergraduate students as well as our alumni. We look forward to presenting at many more BIRC conferences in the future.

Tahoe Slam pits poets against each other in a cash competition

Poets will be aiming for a slam dunk with a cheering and jeering audience at Sierra Nevada College’s Fifth Annual Poetry Slam at 7 p.m. Friday, April 25, in Patterson Hall.

This contest of performance poetry casts aside the drawing room image of poetry readings, and opens the door to a raucus, fun-loving celebration of the art of the spoken word. With a promise to be entertaining and enlightening, the event is free and open to the public.

Any poet is invited to perform original work at the competition for a panel of judges. The audience is welcome to make its opinions known by hollering and hissing, cheering and applauding the judges’ scores  – all in good nature.

Poets who would like to participate in Sierra Nevada College’s Slam should arrive at least 20 minutes before the event to add their name to the list of competitors for a shot at the title of Tahoe Slam Poet of the year and the first place prize of $300. Second and third place winners receive $200 and $100 respectively. The contest is limited to the first 10 poets to sign up. Each poet should have two poems prepared.

Continue reading

Field Experience to take students to remote Alaskan village

Chandalar_River_near_Arctic_Village

The Chandalar River near Arctic Village, Alaska. Photo by William Troyer of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Students will be camping in the Arctic Village of the Gwich’in Tribe, while learning about the potential impacts of petroleum exploration in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) during a Sustainability field course in August.

Sustainability Instructor Brennan Legasse will lead a group of 5-7 students to Alaska on Aug. 6-15. This field trip intends to immerse students in the Arctic environment to help them better understand the traditional and contemporary lives of Indigenous people living in Arctic Village, those that advocate for ecosystem health in the local bioregion, and how the world’s dependence on a finite, polluting resource compromises the attainment of holistic sustainability.

Besides exploring the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge, the students will be meeting with tribal elders about climate change and tribal members about socio-cultural issues born from colonization and proposed resource extraction plans.

The Arctic Village Visitor Center.

The Arctic Village Visitor Center.
Photo by Wazefaire via Wikimedia Commons

The cost of the course is just under $3,000, including airfare, food, a one-night stay in Fairbanks, camping fees, and a tribal donation. The course number is Sustainability 381 for those interested in signing up.

Students will live in Arctic Village, camping during their trip and will have daily interdisciplinary engagements that touch on Outdoor Adventure Leadership, Sustainability, and Environmental Science. This is a special opportunity to live with members of the Gwich’in Tribe, visit the wild landscape of ANWR, and address issues of sustainability through an intimate experience in a unique place.

 

A huge congratulations to SNC psychology seniors and alumni!!!

This year we submitted to present at 3 external psychology conferences: Nevada Undergraduate Research Symposium (NURS), UC Berkeley (BIRC), and the Association for Psychological Science (APS).

I’m almost in shock to present a 100% hit rate.  What I am NOT is surprised because each and every one of these students deserves these opportunities given the blood, sweat, and tears they poured into their research.

In summary:

11 projects will be presented by  10 current SNC students and 4 alumni at NURS

8 projects will be presented by 7 current SNC students and 3 alumni at BIRC

2 projects will be presented by 5 SNC students and faculty at APS.

These students wanted these opportunities as bad as I wanted these chances for them.  A wonderful day in undergraduate research at SNC!

NURS                                    CAL Berkeley                                APS

 

Honors Symposium Tonight!

This is a reminder of SNC’s 2014 Honors Program Symposium, which takes place tonight at 7pm (in TCES 139).  Five honors students will be presenting their research projects for the SNC community.  Each presentation will be about 10-15 minutes long with time for questions.  For two students, Bryce Bullins and Cole Mizak, this will afford the opportunity to share their research prior to presenting at the country’s largest undergraduate research conference, the National Conference on Undergraduate Research, hosted this year at the University of Kentucky, Lexington.  Please come out and support these outstanding students’ work and the culture of academic excellence at SNC.  Here is a list of student presentations:

Bryce Bullins, “The Urgency for Temporal Revolution”

Benjamin Currier, Minor Literature: Revolutionary Tendencies in the Works of Chuck Palahniuk”
Bridget McGuigan, “Becoming a Great Leader”
Cole Mizak, “’Economic Development’ or ‘Public Use’”
Juan Sandoval, “Death and Dying in America”

 We look forward to seeing you!

–The Honors Program

Good Morning Truckee! Let’s talk journalism

Good Morning Truckee! Every table was filled, and nearly every place marked by hot coffee, as Truckee-Donner Chamber members gathered in the Tahoe-Truckee Airport Conference Room for the community breakfast forum. Each month a different subject is featured and this month’s topic was “The Changing Landscape of Media.”

Tanya Canino, reading the news, as always.

Tanya Canino, reading the news, as always.

As a longtime journalist in the area and the journalism instructor at Sierra Nevada College, I was invited to be the panel discussion moderator for the morning. On the panel were Michael Gelbman, publisher of the Sierra Sun and North Lake Tahoe Bonanza, Mayumi Elegado, owner and publisher of Moonshine Ink, Katherine Hill, owner and publisher of The Weekly, JD Hoss, of KTKE 101.5 FM, Eric Brandt of Tahoe TV and Robert Grossman of Lake Tahoe TV News.

Chamber organizers asked me to talk about my 25-year career in the area and then give an overview of the changing media landscape, before asking thought-provoking questions of our panel.

Continue reading

Eagle’s Eye editors fly to New York City journalism conference

Eagle's Eye editors take a stop during their stroll through Central Park in New York City.

Eagle’s Eye editors take a stop during their stroll through Central Park in New York City. From left to right are Drew Fisher, Sage Sauerbrey, Marissa Stone, Eliza Demarest, Samantha Marquardt and Keala Reeverts.

Big sights, big sounds and a big journalism conference captivated six students and one adviser from the Eagle’s Eye newspaper, March 12-15 in New York City.

The College Media Association hosted the National College Media Convention, which attracted 1200 student journalists to participate in over 250 sessions, tours to top publications such as New York Times, keynotes by famous journalists like CBS News’ Scott Pelley, and a Times Square location in the center of the media capital of the United States.

Eagle’s Eye Managing Editor Marissa Stone, News Editor Samantha Marquardt, Photo Editor Eliza Demarest, Online Editor Drew Fisher, Sports Editor Sage Sauerbrey and Asst. Photo Editor Keala Reeverts, along with Adviser Tanya Canino, jetted across country on a Red Eye, arriving in New York City at 7 a.m. Wednesday, March 12. After navigating the subway to their hotel, the SNC group began sightseeing with walks through Central Park,  a stop at McGee’s Pub (the inspiration for How I Met Your Mother) and finished the night with the musical, Once.

Thursday through Sunday were devoted to the journalism conference, where students could pick and choose which sessions they wanted to attend. Continue reading

Prepare for Poetry Center opening by reading acclaimed poems

Spend a little time this week to savor some poetry from California’s poet laureate, Juan Felipe Herrera. Then, make sure you show up to the Poetry Center’s Grand Opening Friday, where Herrera himself will be reading from his poems, along with Jane Hirshfield, who holds many awards for her poetry.

Sierra Nevada College’s website describes his work: Herrera’s poetry brims with simultaneity and exuberance, and often takes shape in mural-like, rather than narrative, frames. His creative work often crosses genres, including poetry, opera and dance theater. The NY Times described Herrera as one of the first poets to successfully create “a new hybrid art, part oral, part written, part English, part something else: an art grounded in ethnic identity, fueled by collective pride, yet irreducibly individual too.”

poetry center books

Photo by Keala Reeverts, Eagle’s Eye

The Poetry Center, located in Prim Library, holds one of the largest collections of contemporary poetry in Nevada and will be the center of a diverse program of readings and workshops. Funded through grants from the Nevada State Library and Archives and the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the poetry center holds 500 volumes of poetry acquired by the grant, plus 3,000 more from donations. Like the library itself, the Poetry Center’s collections and programs are open to the general public and offer free access to all Nevada residents.

Continue reading

What I learned from a Multimedia Story

By Johanna Tikkanen

 Ivory Wars: Last Stand in Zakouma by Michael Nichols

I really liked the way the multimedia story Last Stand in Zakouma told the horrific situation happening currently in Africa. It was a story of elephants, and how they are brutally killed just for their horns, that the locals can sell for high price. I think that this is a very horrible situation for both, locals and the elephants. The people killing these animals are obviously poor, and by killing elephants they can bring food for their family. I still believe that there has to be another way to make a living than killing endangered species. I felt so bad looking at the audioslide show, showing all these elephants, having their head chopped to pieces, just to get their horns. They are left exactly at that place they were shot down, to rot.

This multimedia story, really expressed feelings effectively and I bet that if everyone would share this story, people would start noticing and wanting to make a difference towards better. I’m touched by this story, and that’s what a multimedia story I believe is about. By adding video, photos and audio, these storytellers really made the viewer feel more involved with the story. Especially when they showed elephant Annie’s journey around Africa, and how she got killed.

I think I’m going to try to tell my Multimedia Story more with video and audio, because now I only have few videos and a lot of photos. Audio definitely adds more emotion and allows to express feelings. This story really makes me want to jump on a plane to Africa and save the Elephants, which was probably the point that the storytellers wanted.

 

Social Media for Journalists and why it’s worthwhile to learn

By Johanna Tikkanen

I’m a Business major, who is pursuing a minor in Journalism. Last semester I took ENGL275, Introduction to Multimedia Journalism and loved it. This semester I took a step higher class, Intermediate Multimedia Journalism. I really like this class, and one of our assignments was to take a course online at Knight Center. It’s called Social Media for Journalists, and I believe that all Journalism students should take it.

I learned a lot from the 5 week Social Media for Journalists course hosted by Knight Center. To be completely honest, I though it was very boring at first, but when I decided to take a right mindset towards it, I felt like I got a lot of useful information out of it. I think that the lecture of “Find Sources and audience with social media.” was the most helpful for me. I learned how to use social media to target the right audience for me; I started to think more about the audience, and what might be unique that could appeal to them. Also one important (Kind of obvious) was learning that word of mouth is one of the most powerful thing and its rife among people in social media. So if I connect with those that are connected to my target audience, it might be a job worthwhile. Then I started wondering, who is my target audience, and what’s funny is that you can use Google Analytics to find that out specifically.

Also, the importance of social media websites as; Facebook, Twitter and Linkedin was highlighted. By creating accounts or pages on this websites, you can interact with people more effectively. There are 1.4 billion Facebook users and the average time these people spend on Facebook is 15 hours per month.

If starting a new business, you must have the previously mentioned, its basically free advertising and grows your business avareness. Google Analytics is a perfect tool for figuring out the target audience. I definitely learned a lot from this course and have an idea how Social Media could be useful in Business.