Category Archives: Uncategorized

The importance of balance

I often am overambitious. Sure, it’s good to have high expectations for yourself, but if you fill your plate with too many commitments and responsibilities, crashing and burning is nearly inevitable.

This is exactly what happened to me this semester.

In January, 19 credits and two jobs seemed exciting and doable. I told myself that the more was on my plate, the more productive and successful I’d be. I doubled up on intensive interdisciplinary classes that were supposed to taken sequentially. I formulated independent-study-type classes and commitments in order to fit everything in. Now, as March concludes, I’m having second thoughts.

I’m trying to graduate a semester early (this December) to save money. School isn’t my thing, so I’m just trying to get done as soon as possible. This December, at 21 years old, I’ll have completed my bachelor’s degree.

I’m proud of myself. As a two-time transfer student, I never would have thought I’d finish college in three and a half years and have a degree and respectable GPA to show for it. But here I am. I made my own luck.

Unfortunately, this ambition hasn’t come without sacrifices.

I went out to a party for the first time all semester (and probably the third or fourth time all school year) last weekend. It was a blast, but I was so hungover the following day that I missed work and fell even farther behind on the the glaring pile of assignments due. I felt guilty for going out and was ridden with regret and stress.

Here’s the problem with what I’m trying to do this semester. I’m so invested in school and work that there’s no room for anything else. Should I feel guilty for going out and having fun with friends? Absolutely not. Should I beat myself up for spending a night with Netflix and a pint of Ben and Jerry’s? No. Should I detest my classes and dread class every day? No, but I do because they’re all that my life revolves around.

College academics aren’t life. College isn’t life! There’s so much more to this time in our lives than just getting the grade; getting the degree. If this is the only life we get, I don’t want to look back at my 19- and 20-year-old self and say, “Wow, all she did was homework and work.”

If I were to get hit by a car and die tomorrow, that would suck. That would suck in general, but it would especially suck because the years leading up to it weren’t lived well. I’d have an impressive transcript to show for it, but no amazing, memorable experiences to cherish forever.

Life should be an enjoyable journey and we should aspire to be happy. I shouldn’t be counting down the days until graduation in hopes that something better will follow.

Go out and party. Eat the slice of cake. Skip class to hit the slopes on that perfect pow day.

Then, nurse your hangover and drink lots of water. Hit the gym. Write that A-worthy research paper. Go to class. Get shit done.

We often lose sight of this awesome concept of life underneath the weight of all the responsibilities given to students. We’re young and able-bodied and we’re living in one of the most beautiful places in the world. Go out and enjoy it.

I’m not saying you shouldn’t take school seriously; college is a big investment and you get out what you put in.

If I could go back, I’d take on a lot less. Less credits each semester. Only apply for one job. I’d fill my days with more things I want to do, not just things I should do. I’d stick around in Tahoe a bit longer, even if it means a bit more debt down the road.

School is important, but so is self-care and happiness. Keep it balanced.

SNC Career Fair is Happening Today!

The career fair is today, October 9th, in SNC’s Patterson Hall from 11am to 2pm.

There will be a “Professionally Dressed Drawing” so come dressed professionally and be entered into a drawing for our “night out” basket with gift certificates to Wild Alaskan, Incline Theater, and Candy.  Employers will hand tickets out to students they deem are dressed professionally and these tickets will be entered in a “drawing.”

Companies on campus to recruit include:

Alpine Meadows​
Bluewater LLC
Boreal
Chase International
Crest Mortgage
CustomInk
Diamond Peak
Great Basin Outdoor School
Harrah’s and Harvey’s Hotel& Casino
Homewood Mountain Resort
Hyatt
International City Mortgage
IVGID (Incline Village General Improvement District)
KNPB
Meek’s Lumber and Hardware
Mt. Rose
Northstar
Out and About Marketing
Resort at Squaw Creek
Sierra Nevada College-Graduate Admissions
Sierra Nevada Journeys
Squaw Valley Ski Corp
StudentStock
Sugar Bowl
TRPA
US Forest Service
Wyndham Vacation Ownership
Zulily’s
 
Hope to see you there!!
Professional Preparedness Poster

Attending the Senior Symposium

On May 8th a collection of the best and brightest of Sierra Nevada College all gathered in a single room to showcase all of the intelligent things they created. There were business majors, artists, authors, inventors and Bryce Bullins all trying to prove to the world that an overpriced liberal arts degree is worth its weight in salt. The jury is still out.

I showed up at three o’clock because I had nothing better to do with my life. Presenters were already jockeying for position and I watched as a water-bottle bear was wheeled into the room, and paintings were fastened via tape and thumbtacks to a single sheet of wall erected for just that purpose. I wandered around briefly taking in a few of the more interesting projects already present.

I then received a phone call. “Bruins game in an hour.” I left, and watched the game. The Bruins pulled a win out of their hat in overtime to tie the series up with the Canadiens, but that is beside the point. It was great to watch, but beside the point. America!

When I returned to the symposium it was in full swing. Large amounts of Sodexo mush sat on a table, and the lovely Ophelia was pouring wine and popping beers with vim and vigor. I helped myself to one and then another.  I also tipped.  Tip your bar tenders.  Just because you pay lots of money to the college does not mean any of it goes to their employees.  Seriously, help them out. I then began to explore.

Most projects were so packed that I had to stand on my tip-toes to read them. The beers I drank did not help me with this.  I soon gave the tactic up. I observed the voting box for a few moments. Days before the symposium I heard talk of voter fraud. Apparently last year a student had been heard stating, “I voted six times,” as he swilled his beer. The Republican in me was shocked when no person was present requesting IDs and fingerprints. This is how Obama won the election. Travesty.

While the crowds were immense I did manage to see a few projects. A group of sustainability majors put together a solar cooler. This was impressive. An artist painted very creepy portraits. These were enjoyable. An English major ranted about Shakespeare while clutching a medieval tome like the King James Bible, and a Creative Writing major created and electronically published a graphic novel. All the projects I enjoyed were in-depth and creative. There were also a plethora of other disciplines present, mostly business majors. Unfortunately I unconsciously avoid talking to people wearing blazers until I have talked to everyone else. I ran out of time before I could talk to everyone else.  This is a personal problem and I am working on it, or hate myself for working on it.  Maybe I am bi-polar.  Do not listen to anything I say.  Anyways, here are some facts.

A project by Elaine Inglis titled Call structure of the mountain chickadee (Poecile gambeli) in the presence and absence of food won first place while a project titled Solar Innovations took second. Hydraulic and Restoration Analysis of Incline Creek by Ashley Vandermeer took third. Projects by Chelsea Cunningham and Bryce Bullins took fourth and fifth respectively. All in all the event was quite a success boasting at least a hundred people in attendance and intelligent conversation all around.

What I learned from a Multimedia Story

By Johanna Tikkanen

 Ivory Wars: Last Stand in Zakouma by Michael Nichols

I really liked the way the multimedia story Last Stand in Zakouma told the horrific situation happening currently in Africa. It was a story of elephants, and how they are brutally killed just for their horns, that the locals can sell for high price. I think that this is a very horrible situation for both, locals and the elephants. The people killing these animals are obviously poor, and by killing elephants they can bring food for their family. I still believe that there has to be another way to make a living than killing endangered species. I felt so bad looking at the audioslide show, showing all these elephants, having their head chopped to pieces, just to get their horns. They are left exactly at that place they were shot down, to rot.

This multimedia story, really expressed feelings effectively and I bet that if everyone would share this story, people would start noticing and wanting to make a difference towards better. I’m touched by this story, and that’s what a multimedia story I believe is about. By adding video, photos and audio, these storytellers really made the viewer feel more involved with the story. Especially when they showed elephant Annie’s journey around Africa, and how she got killed.

I think I’m going to try to tell my Multimedia Story more with video and audio, because now I only have few videos and a lot of photos. Audio definitely adds more emotion and allows to express feelings. This story really makes me want to jump on a plane to Africa and save the Elephants, which was probably the point that the storytellers wanted.

 

Humanities Professors Bankston and King Hit the Conference Scene.

Dr. Samantha Bankston and Dr. Robert King will be giving presentations at a variety of conferences this winter.  Dr. Bankston just returned from a conference for the F. Scott Fitzgerald Society at Troy University, Alabama, where she delivered a talk on a post-structural analysis of Zelda Fitzgerald’s paintings.  Next in line, Dr. Bankston will be traveling to the University of Cincinnati where she’ll be presenting her paper, “The Ontological Parallax of Žižek and Deleuze: Dialectic vs. Assemblage and the Production of the New,” for the International Žižek Studies Conference where Slavoj Žižek himself will close the conference as the keynote speaker. Dr. Bankston will use the Slovenian philosopher’s notion of parallax to develop a new ontological theory that makes use of both Žižek’s and Deleuze’s epistemologies.  She hopes to exchange a “My God!” or an “and so on, and so on” with Žižek in person.  For his part, Dr. King will be attending a conference in Zurich, Switzerland, entitled, “Traveling Narratives: Modernity and the Spatial Imaginary.”  Dr. King will present his ideas on how we conceive, create, and are constrained by space in the modern system of capitalism.  His conference paper will also be featured as a chapter in a book, Ecocriticism and Geocriticism: Overlapping Territories in Environmental and Spatial Literary Studies.  King will also be traveling to New York City to give a paper at NYU.  There, the Telos Institute will be hosting a conference entitled, “The Difficulty of Democracy: Diagnoses and Prognoses.”  King will join leading scholars of the theory of democracy to discuss key issues confronting democracy in the world today.

Information about the conferences:

http://www.zizekstudiesconference.com/call-for-papers.html

http://www.fscottfitzgeraldsociety.org/

http://www.es.uzh.ch/teaching/PhD/phdlit/TravellingNarratives.html

http://www.telosinstitute.net/conference/