Category Archives: Uncategorized

SNC Career Fair is Happening Today!

The career fair is today, October 9th, in SNC’s Patterson Hall from 11am to 2pm.

There will be a “Professionally Dressed Drawing” so come dressed professionally and be entered into a drawing for our “night out” basket with gift certificates to Wild Alaskan, Incline Theater, and Candy.  Employers will hand tickets out to students they deem are dressed professionally and these tickets will be entered in a “drawing.”

Companies on campus to recruit include:

Alpine Meadows​
Bluewater LLC
Boreal
Chase International
Crest Mortgage
CustomInk
Diamond Peak
Great Basin Outdoor School
Harrah’s and Harvey’s Hotel& Casino
Homewood Mountain Resort
Hyatt
International City Mortgage
IVGID (Incline Village General Improvement District)
KNPB
Meek’s Lumber and Hardware
Mt. Rose
Northstar
Out and About Marketing
Resort at Squaw Creek
Sierra Nevada College-Graduate Admissions
Sierra Nevada Journeys
Squaw Valley Ski Corp
StudentStock
Sugar Bowl
TRPA
US Forest Service
Wyndham Vacation Ownership
Zulily’s
 
Hope to see you there!!
Professional Preparedness Poster

Psychology Alumni Pay a Visit

As our Fall 2014 semester begins, our psychology alumni were gracious enough to share their experiences in both the Research Methods and Introduction to APA.  The alumni who visited included Morgan Burke, Cindy Conover, Kallie Day, Anza Jarschke, & Evelina Rutdal.  It is always great to see our alumni and hear about all of their achievements since graduation!

 

Presentation1

 

 

Beau Kissler and Christina Frederick get published!

Beau D. Kissler, BA, and Christina M. Frederick, Ph.D., have just been published in the Undergraduate Research Journal for the Human Sciences for their work entitled, The Heart’s Hand in Creativity: The Effect of Coherence™ Meditation.  Kissler conducted research that allowed him to collaborate with his dream organization, was invited to give a talk at Stanford University,  and completed a project which led to his third publication.

The Psychology Department looks forward to introducing our next published student!

beau

 

Attending the Senior Symposium

On May 8th a collection of the best and brightest of Sierra Nevada College all gathered in a single room to showcase all of the intelligent things they created. There were business majors, artists, authors, inventors and Bryce Bullins all trying to prove to the world that an overpriced liberal arts degree is worth its weight in salt. The jury is still out.

I showed up at three o’clock because I had nothing better to do with my life. Presenters were already jockeying for position and I watched as a water-bottle bear was wheeled into the room, and paintings were fastened via tape and thumbtacks to a single sheet of wall erected for just that purpose. I wandered around briefly taking in a few of the more interesting projects already present.

I then received a phone call. “Bruins game in an hour.” I left, and watched the game. The Bruins pulled a win out of their hat in overtime to tie the series up with the Canadiens, but that is beside the point. It was great to watch, but beside the point. America!

When I returned to the symposium it was in full swing. Large amounts of Sodexo mush sat on a table, and the lovely Ophelia was pouring wine and popping beers with vim and vigor. I helped myself to one and then another.  I also tipped.  Tip your bar tenders.  Just because you pay lots of money to the college does not mean any of it goes to their employees.  Seriously, help them out. I then began to explore.

Most projects were so packed that I had to stand on my tip-toes to read them. The beers I drank did not help me with this.  I soon gave the tactic up. I observed the voting box for a few moments. Days before the symposium I heard talk of voter fraud. Apparently last year a student had been heard stating, “I voted six times,” as he swilled his beer. The Republican in me was shocked when no person was present requesting IDs and fingerprints. This is how Obama won the election. Travesty.

While the crowds were immense I did manage to see a few projects. A group of sustainability majors put together a solar cooler. This was impressive. An artist painted very creepy portraits. These were enjoyable. An English major ranted about Shakespeare while clutching a medieval tome like the King James Bible, and a Creative Writing major created and electronically published a graphic novel. All the projects I enjoyed were in-depth and creative. There were also a plethora of other disciplines present, mostly business majors. Unfortunately I unconsciously avoid talking to people wearing blazers until I have talked to everyone else. I ran out of time before I could talk to everyone else.  This is a personal problem and I am working on it, or hate myself for working on it.  Maybe I am bi-polar.  Do not listen to anything I say.  Anyways, here are some facts.

A project by Elaine Inglis titled Call structure of the mountain chickadee (Poecile gambeli) in the presence and absence of food won first place while a project titled Solar Innovations took second. Hydraulic and Restoration Analysis of Incline Creek by Ashley Vandermeer took third. Projects by Chelsea Cunningham and Bryce Bullins took fourth and fifth respectively. All in all the event was quite a success boasting at least a hundred people in attendance and intelligent conversation all around.

SNC Psychology Students go to the University of Nevada, Reno to Present Research

UNR9 Sierra Nevada College undergraduates and 3 Sierra Nevada College Alumni presented their research at the Nevada Undergraduate Research Symposium (NURS) on April 23rd, 2014 at the University of Nevada, Reno.

The undergraduate students who presented included:

Jennifer Balaban,Morgan S. Burke, Margaret K. Burns, Kallie B. Day, Jamie L. Himes, and Dana Hoffelt.

Our Sierra Nevada College alumni who presented included:

Elizabeth M. Hill, who was also chosen for one of six oral presentations included during the conference and Constance A. Barnes (alumni) presenting with fellow undergraduate authors, Kallie B. Day, Carly Courtney, and Briana Crespo, and for mentors Christina M. Frederick and Robert King.

Our Sierra Nevada College Psychological Society was also in attendance for this event including, Stephanie Kwon, Zack Birdsdale, Tess Rafello, and Arno Ruymaekers.  A big thanks to the society for providing lunch for our presenters.

This trip was rewarding for both Sierra Nevada College’s undergraduate students as well as our alumni.  We look forward to presenting at many more NURS conferences in the future.

SNC Psychology Students go to UC Berkeley to Present Research

BIRCA total of five Sierra Nevada College undergraduates and three Sierra Nevada College alumni presented at the 3rd annual Berkeley Interdisciplinary Research Conference (BIRC) on May 3rd, 2014 at UC Berkeley.

The undergraduate students: Morgan S. Burke, Margaret K. Burns, Cindy A. Conover, and Dana Hoffelt.

Our Sierra Nevada College alumni and their projects included: Constance A. Barnes presenting for fellow authors, Christina M. Frederick, Kallie B. Day, Robert King, Carly Courtney, and Briana Crespo, Elizabeth M. Hill, and Anna Jarschke.

This trip was rewarding for both Sierra Nevada College’s undergraduate students as well as our alumni. We look forward to presenting at many more BIRC conferences in the future.

A huge congratulations to SNC psychology seniors and alumni!!!

This year we submitted to present at 3 external psychology conferences: Nevada Undergraduate Research Symposium (NURS), UC Berkeley (BIRC), and the Association for Psychological Science (APS).

I’m almost in shock to present a 100% hit rate.  What I am NOT is surprised because each and every one of these students deserves these opportunities given the blood, sweat, and tears they poured into their research.

In summary:

11 projects will be presented by  10 current SNC students and 4 alumni at NURS

8 projects will be presented by 7 current SNC students and 3 alumni at BIRC

2 projects will be presented by 5 SNC students and faculty at APS.

These students wanted these opportunities as bad as I wanted these chances for them.  A wonderful day in undergraduate research at SNC!

NURS                                    CAL Berkeley                                APS

 

What I learned from a Multimedia Story

By Johanna Tikkanen

 Ivory Wars: Last Stand in Zakouma by Michael Nichols

I really liked the way the multimedia story Last Stand in Zakouma told the horrific situation happening currently in Africa. It was a story of elephants, and how they are brutally killed just for their horns, that the locals can sell for high price. I think that this is a very horrible situation for both, locals and the elephants. The people killing these animals are obviously poor, and by killing elephants they can bring food for their family. I still believe that there has to be another way to make a living than killing endangered species. I felt so bad looking at the audioslide show, showing all these elephants, having their head chopped to pieces, just to get their horns. They are left exactly at that place they were shot down, to rot.

This multimedia story, really expressed feelings effectively and I bet that if everyone would share this story, people would start noticing and wanting to make a difference towards better. I’m touched by this story, and that’s what a multimedia story I believe is about. By adding video, photos and audio, these storytellers really made the viewer feel more involved with the story. Especially when they showed elephant Annie’s journey around Africa, and how she got killed.

I think I’m going to try to tell my Multimedia Story more with video and audio, because now I only have few videos and a lot of photos. Audio definitely adds more emotion and allows to express feelings. This story really makes me want to jump on a plane to Africa and save the Elephants, which was probably the point that the storytellers wanted.

 

Sierra Nevada College Welcomes Instructor Wade Brown

Sierra Nevada College would likeW. Brown to put forward a warm welcome to Thomas Wade Brown. Over the winter break, Wade accepted the position of Instructor of Humanities and Social Sciences and has been assigned to teach classes in the Psychology Program.

Wade is a doctoral candidate in behavioral psychology at the University of Nevada, Reno. He is currently finishing his doctoral dissertation on the role of language in financial decision making. His research interests include Instructional Design, Adult Learning, Complex Organizational Behavior, and Behavior-Based Safety.

Early in Wade’s training, he identified a passion for teaching students. In 2010, he completed his Master’s Degree in Psychology where his thesis focused on digital math modules that assisted students in a statistics course. Since 2010, Wade has held a number of teaching appointments throughout the Northern Nevada region. In 2012, Wade was given the Excellence in Teaching Award for Psychology from Truckee Meadows Community College. He has taught a variety of different courses, ranging from Intro Psychology to courses in Organizational Behavior and Philosophy.

Wade has presented papers at Regional, National, and International conferences on a variety of topics including sports psychology, media interpretations of science, and university instruction. He maintains active professional memberships in a variety of organizations, and hopes to acquire leadership positions in regional organizations in the next few years.

Wade’s role at SNC started in 2011 when he was hired as an Instructional Designer for the Online Degree Program. To this day, Wade is still very active with this program where he continues to build and teach courses. This current semester, Wade is teaching Introductory Psychology, Environmental Perception and Human Development, and Neuroscience.

Wade is a native Nevadan and grew up in the southern part of the state. In his spare time, he enjoys spending time with his wife and two children, playing golf, and reading mystery novels. His biggest non-academic goal is to complete a half-marathon sometime in the next year.

Wade is incredibly excited to be working at Sierra Nevada College and hopes to be an asset to the college for years to come.

A Publication for SNC’s Psychology and Business Department

Presenting at UNR
Just wanted to take a moment to congratulate the efforts of a wonderful team of researchers, Maggie Burns, Jaime Aitkenhead, Shannon Wardlow Huddy, and myself on successful publication of our study called “Undergraduate Internship Expectations: Strategic encouragement of Student Involvement” in Student Pulse.  Our article is currently featured on their welcome page.
I am proud to have worked with each one of you and ecstatic about this accomplishment.
Check it out: http://www.studentpulse.com/articles/838/undergraduate-internship-expectations-strategic-encouragement-of-student-involvement