Category Archives: Humanities

SNC Psychology Returns from Stanford

The SNC Psychology Students returned from the Stanford Undergraduate Psychology Conference that was held May 20th-21st. The students presented their independent research projects in both poster and oral sessions.

Our very own President, Dr. Alan Walker, also attended the event to support our students! Three generations of Alumni were present as well.

Our group had a wonderful time and we look forward to future opportunities to present research at Stanford University.

Stanford Edit

INTD 300: Service Learning Reflection

Interdisciplinary Studies majors must take three INTD curriculum classes throughout their time at SNC: Intro to Interdisciplinary Studies, Service Learning, and Senior Portfolio. This semester, I was enrolled in the intro class as well as the service learning class.

Throughout the semester, I had mixed feelings about my service learning class.

On one hand, it was great to have the opportunity to obtain volunteer hours while gaining class credit at the same time. On the other hand, it was really time intensive to do so.

Our class was required to partner with a non-profit organization and dedicate 60 hours to volunteering with them, along with another 10-20 hours to create a final culminating project.

Since I was taking many other time-intensive classes along with this one, I often felt overwhelmed and had a negative opinion about the class. I felt like my volunteering hours weren’t making a difference and it was causing me to fall behind in other classes.

Despite the stress, the outcome of this class has surpassed my expectations. Along with my six other service learning classmates, we presented our service learning experiences to faculty and friends on Wednesday, May 4th. While explaining the work I did for my non-profit, the presentation allowed me to reflect on the journey and see how far I’ve come since starting the project in January.

As an Interdisciplinary major in ODAL and JOurnalism, it was impressive how much I used the skills in an interdisciplinary way to benefit the organization and grow as a person. My professionalism and communication skills have improved, and I’ve grown my multimedia journalism knowledge and have created an awesome final article to show for it. I took the thing I learned in a school environment and transferred them into a professional environment; a perfect stepping stone for a senior in college about to graduate and venture into the real world.

While I don’t want to go back and experience that stress again, it was well worth it in the end. Thank you Interdisciplinary Studies for forcing me to grow as a student and an individual!

Learning Multimedia Journalism at SNC

Since become a Journalism major and immersing myself in the program here at SNC, I’ve learned a thing or two about the ins and outs of writing successful, engaging stories.

Last semester, I took a class called Beginning Multimedia Journalism. I didn’t know what to expect, but in an increasingly technology-driven society, I knew it would be essential material to learn.

In the beginning class, we learned how to incorporate multiple types of media into journalism, such as digital, video, and audio media. We learned how to use Audacity, Google Maps, iMovie, Photoshop, and other programs to implement multimedia into our articles.

I enjoyed the class and decided to take Intermediate Multimedia Journalism this semester. Tanya, my teacher, created curriculum for me and the one other intermediate student, and geared the class as an independent study. We decided what we would focus our multimedia skills on, created a spreadsheet of our hours spent working for Tanya to review. We would also come into the beginner multimedia class every other week to share some insight with the beginner students and help post articles to the Eagle’s Eye website.

This semester, through Intermediate Multimedia Journalism, I have furthered my skills and created some impressive work to show for it. I decided to gear my learning towards social media by taking over the ODAL facebook page and making posts throughout the week. I also created blog posts (like this one!), worked with Rosie Hackett on other ODAL social media initiatives, took Google Analytics courses, and created an online portfolio to showcase my journalism work.

As my final project, I created a multimedia story using Readymag, an online web publication software. Here’s how it turned out:

https://readymag.com/530546

I’m extremely proud with how far I’ve come, both in this class and at SNC. The journalism program, thanks to its amazing faculty, has transformed me from a timid writer to a confident journalist. I couldn’t be happier with my education here at SNC.

Lost Sierra Hoedown: SNC alumni teach sustainable event production to students

By Justine Nelson

The third annual Lost Sierra Hoedown commences this weekend from Thursday to Sunday (Sept.24-27). The original spark of inspiration to support the Johnsville Historic Ski Bowl has transformed into a must-have experience! This four-day event features local music, simple and sustainable living, and the natural excitement of spending the weekend lost in the woods.

Drew Fisher on the left as one of the founders of the Lost Sierra Hoedown. It began as a Service Learning project in Interdisciplinary Studies.

Drew Fisher on the left as one of the founders of the Lost Sierra Hoedown. It began as a Service Learning project in Interdisciplinary Studies.

This third annual Hoedown has come a long way. Drew Fischer, one of the founders and now an alumnus to SNC, is teaching a one credit interdisciplinary and sustainability class focused on non-profit music festival production and is using the making of the Lost Sierra Hoedown as the example.

Topics covered in the class include sustainable practices, land management, social media coverage, stage management and event operation. Students not only get to learn about how to successfully plan an event, but get the chance to actually run an event as well. The students will help facilitate the hoedown and get hands on experience beyond what taught in the classroom setting.

Supported by six local companies and in association with four local organizations, the Lost Sierra Hoedown is a prime illustration of what SNC’s students are capable of, and continues to push the limits of achievement.

For tickets and more information visit the website at lostsierrahoedown.com

Having fun at the Hoedown!

Having fun at the Hoedown!

Humanities 110

The Humanities 110 class began the Psychology portion on Thursday September 3, 2015. The students began their study by visiting stations related to the question, “what does it mean to be human?” We look forward to the next four class meetings and continuing to expose the class to the subject of psychology.

HUMN 110-1

HUMN 110-2

Senior projects to be showcased on Thursday, April 30

Senior Projects and Portfolios will be presented from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, April 30, in Tahoe Center for Environmental Sciences Room 139/141.

An unusually rich selection of the work our Humanities and Social Sciences students have completed this year will be on display, including:

Senior Projects

Sean P. Burke (Psychology): Attention, Attention: Consistent Sensory Stimulation Reduces Inattentional Blindness

 Philip B. Chiesa (Psychology): Getting Creative: Does Boredom Positively Impact Creativity?

Peter Clark (Humanities): Welcome to the World

 Gavin Cooke (English): Approaches to Teaching and Coaching at the High School Level

 Meredith Crosby (English): Truth, Half Truth, and Lies: Contemporary Creative Nonfiction

Melissa Daniels: (Psychology): Skiing: from the Beginning

 Eliza Dunster (Humanities): The Hero’s Journey

 Amber E. Durk (Psychology): The Influence of Names on Self-Accountability

 Juventino Espinoza (Psychology): The Impact of Goals on Productivity

 Peter Freund (Humanities): Historical Analysis of Gambling in Virginia City and Reno, Nevada

 Sarah A. Fricke (Psychology): The Looking Glass Self: The Impact of Explicit Self-Awareness on Self-Esteem

Logan Garrison (English): Through the Greenroom: An Exploration of Electronic Dance Music

 Mary C. Hall (Psychology): Heightened Self-Awareness Increases Immediate Perception of Sexual Satisfaction

Tessa M. Hartman-Sorensen (Psychology): The Power of a Few Words: Prosocial Priming Decreases Disinhibited Behavior in Cyberspace

Kimberly A. Keyzers (Psychology): Be Smart About Where You Start: Grocery Entrances Impact Healthy Food Selection

 Kristina Miranda (Psychology): Sharing the Use of Art Therapy with Others

 Chris Muravez (English): A Season in the Abyss

 Erica R. Nelson (Psychology): Swipe Left: Online Dating Profile Pictures Do Not Impact Narcissism

 Emily Provencher (English): Ephemera’s Memory

 Danielle Ralys (Humanities): Conceptual Art: Before, During and After the Movement

 Senior Portfolios

Justin Carella (DART/MGMT): Digital Management: Online Marketing of Sierra Nevada College’s Business Plan Competition

Spencer Fisch (ODAL/Creative Writing):  A Multi Media Approach to the Nevada Drought

Celia McGuire (SUST): Bird’s Eye View of Community Engagement

 Jordan Petrilla (SUST): The Story of Trash

 Peter Rispolli (ODAL/ENTP):  Guap Natural, Inc.: A Business Strategy to Living Simply and Saving Money

 

 

 

 

Holistic Sustainability Film Night creates awareness

1495267_10154860394870232_9097612480930717245_oDuring the 2014 fall semester, senior Rachael Blum added a honors component to the International Environmental Issues course. She chose to host a short-film film festival with discussions between each film. The project came to fruition through the course, after instructor Brennan Lagasse and Blum were discussing how the rest of the SNC community  does not have access to the Sustainability curriculum. This idea was also acknowledged at a Justice Club meeting with current and former students at the time. The students agreed that a discussion-based space must be made accessible to the entire campus.

The Holistic Sustainability Film Night was created, featuring a variety of short films highlighting biodiversity, desertification, capitalism, and welfare with discussions between each. Faculty Brennan Lagasse, Samantha Bankston, and Bob King were present as experts in the topics and aided in facilitating the discussions.

Approximately 23 people attended, and the event was cut short after 3.5 hours spent viewing and discussing the films. Those in attendance were happy to have a space made available to ask questions, express views, and learn about these issues. Snacks were provided by Uncommon Kitchen and the Justice Club. This also benefitted Kelly Benson’s coat drive for Project Mana. Overall, the event was successful.

Films that were shown include: Forest Man, Freegans: Living Outside of Capitalism, Love and Capitalism, How Welfare Does Not Work the Way You Think.  All movies can be found on Films For Action.

 

Saeed Jones – multifaceted poet, editor – to read his works at Writers in the Woods Feb. 6-7

sjonesWriters in the Woods will feature poet Saeed Jones on at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 6, in Room 139 of Tahoe Center for Environmental Sciences. The award-winning poet will hold a workshop from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Feb. 7. The Friday night reading is free and the Saturday workshop is $50.

Jones is the editor of BuzzFeed LGBT and a Pushcart Prize-winning poet. His debut poetry collection “Prelude to Bruise” was described by Publishers Weekly as “a dark night of the soul presented as the finest of evening gowns.” NPR says his work is both “beautiful and unsparing.” His work has appeared in publications such as Guernica, The Rumpus, Hayden’s Ferry Review, and Blackbird among others. Saeed is the recipient of fellowships from Cave Canem and Queer / Art / Mentors.

Get to know Saeed on his Tumblr. Listen to him read  a few of his poems. Peruse a BuzzFeed article. Listen to him read Toni Morrison and his own poems. Then go see him on Friday.

Sierra Nevada Review earns high praise from national reviewer

Screen Shot 2015-01-30 at 8.32.30 AMThe Review Review, which is a hub for literary journals, dipped into the fiction, poetry and non-fiction stories of the Sierra Nevada Review and came out with a stellar examination of SNC’s literary journal.

The 2014 publication of the Sierra Nevada Review recently earned four out of five stars by reviewer Laura Jean Schneider. She said, “SNR is not afraid to try something new or step on toes. I got the feeling that seems to be its point, to provide a place where things can both happen on the page, in print, and simultaneously within the reader.”

After a careful analysis of each of the 33 pieces in the journal, Schneider offered an insightful, indepth and complimentary review of the Sierra Nevada Review. The review is published on The Review Review website, which reviews small literary journals from universities and independent presses. It was begun by Becky Tuch, who started it as a way to connect writers, editors and readers about what is happening in the world of literary journals.

“It’s a great to be a part of what they’re doing and have a such a thorough and long review of what we did last year,” said Laura Wetherington, an English professor and the adviser for the Sierra Nevada Review.

2014 Sierra Nevada Review

2014 Sierra Nevada Review

The Sierra Nevada Review was given kudos for including writings from the winners of SNC’s High School Writing Contest, as well as sharing experimental poems and unconventional topics. The title of the article was “A Lit Mag Unafraid to Try Something New (and a Writing Contest for Teens!)”

“If there’s a theme underlying the latest issue of the Sierra Nevada Review,” Schneider wrote, “it’s summed up well in a line from contributor Clayton Adam Clark’s poem, ‘Reverberations: … all things / have a pitch.’ The intensity of memory, the complexity of ethnicity, the sacrifices of democracy and the definitions of family­­ weave subtly through this hard copy journal produced by Sierra Nevada College’s English Department and Low-Residency MFA Program.”

The complimentary review puts the icing on the cake for the Sierra Nevada Review, which celebrated its 25th year of publication last year. It was begun by English Chair June Saraceno. Students are currently working on the 26th edition of the literary journal, with an expected publication in May. There is also a growing interest in the Sierra Nevada Review, which doubled the number of students who signed up to be on the staff this semester.

The 25th edition staff, which won the accolades, were:

Fiction Editor – Crystal Miller
Non-Fiction Editor – Chelsea Archer
Poetry Editor – Laurie Macfee
General Editor – Bryce Bullins
Associate Editors – Christopher Muravez, Emily Provencher
Founding/Senior Advisory Editor – June Sylvester Saraceno
Advisory Editor – Laura Wetherington
Cover Art – Carly Petrie
Design/Layout – Laurie Macfee

Scout Sorcic presents “Backcountry Games” at LA conference

Scout is a rockstar and a stellar ambassador of the ODAL Program.

Scout is a rockstar and a stellar ambassador of the ODAL Program.

Scout Sorcic (an Outdoor Adventure Leadership and Ski Business & Resort Management major) not only attended, but also presented at the Western Regional Outdoor Leadership Conference (WROLC) in Los Angeles this month.

Yeow! Here are her highlights from the adventure!

Highlights from Scout:

  • Being a solo presenter from Tahoe surrounded by  huge schools from Southern California and being the only one to present twice.
  • Having 46 people show up for her Backcountry Games Workshop. She also received 18 emails WROLCfrom enthusiastic conference attendees with new games to add to her growing list, found on her blog, YeeHaw Backcountry Games.
  • Learning about post grad positions and how to better apply for outdoor jobs
  • Sunny and 75°
  • Explaining to people that outdoor ed is her degree, not just a hobby.
  • WROLC5Hearing Brendan Leonard speak. He is the author of the “New American Roadtrip Mix tape” and owner of Semi-Rad.com

WROLC6